Canning Sweet Pickle Relish and Bread and Butter Pickles

We planted 4 small cucumber plants in our garden this year.  Those 4 plants sure did produce a whole lot of cucumbers.  We had dozens and dozens of the those crunchy green guys.  What we couldn’t eat or give away we decided to preserve.  Since refrigerator pickles only last a month, and there are only so many pickles we can eat in a month, canning bread and butter pickles as well as relish was our best bet.

I used both the sweet pickle relish and bread and butter pickle recipes from Liana Krissoff’s Book Canning for a New Generation. I highly recommend this book if you really want to do some yummy canning, as well as Marisa McClellan’s Food in Jars.  If you do not have either of these books, I found some pretty comparable recipes for free on the internet: Sweet Pickle Relish and Bread and Butter Pickles.

I cannot wait the 4-6 weeks they take to cure to try them!

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Do you have a favorite pickle or relish recipe to share?

[Disclosure: Salty Suburban Homestead is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to amazon.com. We receive a small commission whenever a product is purchased through these links.  So if you decide to order anything that is recommended on the blog, we would LOVE it if you used the affiliated links. We thank you in advance for your support!]

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Preserving the Summer Squash and Zucchini Harvest

Our summer squash harvest was UNBELIEVABLE this year.  We had an over abundance of the green and yellow squash cluttering our countertop for weeks, and still do. We also received a ton in our CSA.  This seems to be the norm.  Even if you do not have your own garden, I am sure family, friends and neighbors are practically begging you to take some off their hands.

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So, what to do with all this fresh and nutritious produce?  You can simply eat it now; sauté with olive oil and garlic, roast in the oven with other squash, make into pasta and toss with pesto or shred and use in muffins and breads.  Speaking of muffins, here are our favorite! YUM!

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Besides eating all your zucchini and yellow squash right away, you can also preserve it for use later in the year when squash is not in season or available.  We chose to preserve a lot of our harvest by freezing and dehydrating.  You can also can it if you like, we have not tried this method yet.

We make a really great stuffed squash with rice and ground turkey, but it is hot and time consuming to make in the summer.  So we made, blanched and froze the boats to stuff when the weather gets cooler. Also, we sliced and blanched squash coins to freeze.  With these you can just deforest and sauté for a quick side dish. Make sure you blanch your squash before freezing, this will insure it doesn’t get frost bit or go soggy before using.

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Utilize the dehydrator as well for preservation.  This is one of my favorite methods, it doesn’t take up room in your freezer and the dehydrated product last for a very long time.  We shredded and then dehydrated our zucchini.  Find the how-to here.  Later, we can rehydrate the squash with a little water and use in breads, muffins, sauces and sautés.  So many possibilities with this.

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How was your summer squash harvest this year?  How are you eating or preserving it?

[Disclosure: Salty Suburban Homestead is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to amazon.com. We receive a small commission whenever a product is purchased through these links.  So if you decide to order anything that is recommended on the blog, we would LOVE it if you used the affiliated links. We thank you in advance for your support!]

I think I CAN! You CAN too!

Cheesy Cheesy title, sorry guys.  However silly the title might be, it is still completely true.  I was always so scared of canning, until I recently decided to try it out and ended up with the gorgeous citrus segments that don our title page.  Before starting, I enlisted the help of seasoned canners and picked their brains.

Chalk full of new knowledge and encouragement I purchased:

What does one can in the middle of winter?  Why citrus of course!  Whole Foods had organic grapefruit and oranges in bulk bags on sale, score!

I followed all of the instructions that came with the canner, as well as in a few canning books I have recently fell in love with (Food In Jars and Canning for a New Generation), but ultimately ended up using these step by step instructions from Canning Granny. I am a visual learner and the pictures really helped.

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The finished product is both beautiful and delicious!  It really was not hard, but make sure to follow all of the directions exactly and you will be fine. Because if I CAN, YOU CAN!

I can

 

[Disclosure: Salty Suburban Homestead is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to amazon.com. We receive a small commission whenever a product is purchased through these links.  So if you decide to order anything that is recommended on the blog, we would LOVE it if you used the affiliated links. We thank you in advance for your support!]

Welcome to our blog! What is this all about?

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Hello! Welcome to our blog, our home, our family and a peak into our lives.  My name is Colleen, I have a fantastic husband named John and an adorable son, John William.  A little over a year ago, we moved from our one bedroom condo and are slowly starting our way towards a more self-sufficient lifestyle on our own homestead.

You may be wondering, what is this homestead thing all about?  Well, UrbanHomestead.org defines a suburban or urban homestead as, “a suburban or city home in which residents practice self-sufficiency through home food production and storage.”  Also, it is not only about food, but personal energy generation and getting “off grid,” as well.

On our list of homestead goals are:  find a house with land that allows for us to pursue this new life style, compost, start a garden or implement a lawnscaping plan, build and maintain a greenhouse, collect and store rainwater, can and preserve our own food, and build a source of self-supplying energy.

Join us on our journey as we try to make this dream a reality, while having tons of fun on the way! OH! and the name? Its a play on our last name, near and dear to our hearts 🙂