Canning Simple Tomato Salsa

Our tomatoes have finally started to turn red and now we need to use them up.  What better way then sauce and salsa!  Because I do not own a pressure canner, I had to find a highly acidic salsa recipe to water bath can.  This is a pretty simple tomato salsa recipe from Marisa McClellan’s Food in Jars. It is far more tart then I am used to due to the cider vinegar, but I am sure after sitting awhile the flavors will come together and it will be just as enjoyable as any other salsa.

If you do not own this book, here is a pretty comparable recipe for free on the internet 😉


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Do you prefer a canned salsa or a fresh pico de gallo?

[Disclosure:  Salty Suburban Homestead is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to amazon.com. We receive a small commission whenever a product is purchased through these links.  So if you decide to order anything thats recommended on the blog, we would LOVE it if you used the affiliated links. We thank you in advance for your support!]

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Canning Sweet Pickle Relish and Bread and Butter Pickles

We planted 4 small cucumber plants in our garden this year.  Those 4 plants sure did produce a whole lot of cucumbers.  We had dozens and dozens of the those crunchy green guys.  What we couldn’t eat or give away we decided to preserve.  Since refrigerator pickles only last a month, and there are only so many pickles we can eat in a month, canning bread and butter pickles as well as relish was our best bet.

I used both the sweet pickle relish and bread and butter pickle recipes from Liana Krissoff’s Book Canning for a New Generation. I highly recommend this book if you really want to do some yummy canning, as well as Marisa McClellan’s Food in Jars.  If you do not have either of these books, I found some pretty comparable recipes for free on the internet: Sweet Pickle Relish and Bread and Butter Pickles.

I cannot wait the 4-6 weeks they take to cure to try them!

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Do you have a favorite pickle or relish recipe to share?

[Disclosure: Salty Suburban Homestead is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to amazon.com. We receive a small commission whenever a product is purchased through these links.  So if you decide to order anything that is recommended on the blog, we would LOVE it if you used the affiliated links. We thank you in advance for your support!]

Preserving the Summer Squash and Zucchini Harvest

Our summer squash harvest was UNBELIEVABLE this year.  We had an over abundance of the green and yellow squash cluttering our countertop for weeks, and still do. We also received a ton in our CSA.  This seems to be the norm.  Even if you do not have your own garden, I am sure family, friends and neighbors are practically begging you to take some off their hands.

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So, what to do with all this fresh and nutritious produce?  You can simply eat it now; sauté with olive oil and garlic, roast in the oven with other squash, make into pasta and toss with pesto or shred and use in muffins and breads.  Speaking of muffins, here are our favorite! YUM!

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Besides eating all your zucchini and yellow squash right away, you can also preserve it for use later in the year when squash is not in season or available.  We chose to preserve a lot of our harvest by freezing and dehydrating.  You can also can it if you like, we have not tried this method yet.

We make a really great stuffed squash with rice and ground turkey, but it is hot and time consuming to make in the summer.  So we made, blanched and froze the boats to stuff when the weather gets cooler. Also, we sliced and blanched squash coins to freeze.  With these you can just deforest and sauté for a quick side dish. Make sure you blanch your squash before freezing, this will insure it doesn’t get frost bit or go soggy before using.

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Utilize the dehydrator as well for preservation.  This is one of my favorite methods, it doesn’t take up room in your freezer and the dehydrated product last for a very long time.  We shredded and then dehydrated our zucchini.  Find the how-to here.  Later, we can rehydrate the squash with a little water and use in breads, muffins, sauces and sautés.  So many possibilities with this.

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How was your summer squash harvest this year?  How are you eating or preserving it?

[Disclosure: Salty Suburban Homestead is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to amazon.com. We receive a small commission whenever a product is purchased through these links.  So if you decide to order anything that is recommended on the blog, we would LOVE it if you used the affiliated links. We thank you in advance for your support!]

Super Easy Refrigerator Pickles

Crazy rainy nights and sunny 90 degree days have awarded us with a ton of cucumbers in the garden.  Before I decided to take the plunge and go all out with my first pickle canning adventure, I figured I would get my toes wet with a very easy refrigerator pickle recipe instead.  There are thousands of recipes and how-to’s floating around the internet for refrigerator pickles, but I chose the this one from Kansas City Mamas because I had all the ingredients on hand.

You pretty much just wash the jars, wash and cut the cucumbers, place them in the jars with the spices, mix the brined, pour that over everything and place the jars in the fridge. Thats it! Really!

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These are just a basic garlic, however, you can play around with the flavors all you like. What is your favorite pickle flavor?

[Disclosure: Salty Suburban Homestead is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to amazon.com. We receive a small commission whenever a product is purchased through these links.  So if you decide to order anything that is recommended on the blog, we would LOVE it if you used the affiliated links. We thank you in advance for your support!]

 

Pa and MomMoms Vegetable Garden

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This weekend our family was outside planting this years vegetable garden at my parents house, who JW lovingly calls Pa and MomMom.  JW was ready to help in his farmer get-up!  So CUTE!

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We had 36 herb and vegetable seedlings that needed to be planted, 2 potato towers to build, sunflower seeds to sow, a fig tree to plant in a container, the ground to work and a fence to install.  It took almost the entire day, but the garden was ready just in time for an evening shower to water the very appreciative plants.

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What type are garden are you planting this year?  Trying any new types of vegetables or a new growing method?

DIY Potato Tower

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So, as we were cleaning out the panty to make room for the new groceries, we came across a bag of sprouted potatoes!  Jackpot!  Why is a bag of spoiled potatoes a good thing?  Because we were able to use them as seed potatoes for 2 new potato towers.

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Previously we posted about our potato barrel, and it really is growing quite well.  Now we were able to try a different technique called a tower.  It is basically the same as the barrel, except you use wire fencing to create a container and line it with newspaper or brown paper bags.  Then add some soil to the bottom, place your sprouted potato seed pieces and cover with more soil. Continue to water and add more dirt until you reach the top of the container.  Once the leaves turn yellow (about 90 days) check the potatoes for doneness (green potatoes will make you sick).

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We set up our towers in this years vegetable garden so when the potatoes are done we can just cut the wire and add the soil back into the ground to till into next years garden.  Also, we ran out of brown paper bags so one tower is lined on the bottom with an empty soil bag with holes in it. Hey it works for now, and it is an interesting experiment to compare with the other brown bag only tower.

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Have you ever had luck with potato towers?  Growing some spuds this year?